Robert McPeek, PhD
SUNY College of Optometry
33 West 42nd Street New York, NY 10036
(212) 938 - 5762
rmcpeek@sunyopt.edu

Lab Website

Research Description

 

Neural Mechanisms Underlying Attention and Visually-guided Actions

The long-term goal of my research is to elucidate the neural mechanisms underlying attention and visually-guided actions, including eye movements and reaching movements. To pursue this goal, my laboratory uses a range of techniques: performing psychophysical studies, investigating neural correlates using single-unit and local field potential recordings and testing causal relationships between activity and behavior using pharmacological and electrical manipulations of neural activity. Areas of the brain of particular interest include the superior colliculus and frontal cortex. Through collaborations, I am also involved in studies of deficits in attention and visually-guided actions in patients with focal brain damage.

Education

 

Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (Psychology), 1997, Ph D

Harvard University, Cambridge, MA (Computational Neuroscience),1991, A B ,

Positions and Honors

 

Positions

  • 1990-1991: Undergraduate honors thesis work, with P. H. Schiller, M.I.T., Cambridge, MA.

  • 1991-1992: Software engineer, Vision Research Laboratory, Polaroid Corp., Cambridge, MA.

  • 1992-1997: Doctoral program, Cognition, Brain, & Behavior with K. Nakayama, Harvard University.

  • 1997-2001: Postdoctoral training, with E. L. Keller, The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute.

  • 2001-2003: Research Associate, The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute.

  • 2003-2007: Associate Scientist, The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco, CA.

  • 2008-2010: Scientist, The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, San Francisco, CA.

  • 2010: Associate Professor, Dept. of Biological Sciences, SUNY College of Optometry, New York, NY.

Honors

  • 1987-1989: Harvard College Scholarship, Harvard College.

  • 1989-1991: John Harvard Scholarship, Harvard College.

  • 1992: William James Merit Fellowship, Harvard University.

  • 1992-1993: Office of Naval Research Graduate Fellowship.

  • 1993-1996: National Defense Science and Engineering Grant Graduate Fellowship sponsored by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research.

  • 1996-1997: Harvard Graduate Society Fellowship.

  • 1997-2000: Individual National Research Service Award Post-Doctoral Fellowship (NEI).

  • 1998-2000: Rachael C. Atkinson Award, The Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute.

Selected Peer-Reviewed Publications

 

Kosslyn SM, Daly PF, McPeek RM, Alpert NM, Kennedy DN, Caviness VS, Jr. (1993). Using locations to store shape: An indirect effect of a lesion. Cerebral Cortex, 3(6): 567-82.

Sommer MA, Schiller PH, McPeek RM. (1993). What neural pathways mediate express saccades? (Response to Fischer & Weber). Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 16: 589-90.

McPeek RM, Schiller PH. (1994).The effects of visual scene composition on the latency of saccadic eye movements of the rhesus monkey. Vision Research, 34(17): 2293-305.

McPeek RM, Keller EL, Nakayama K. (1999). Concurrent processing of saccades (Response to Findlay & Walker). Behavioral and Brain Sciences, 22: 691-2.

McPeek RM, Maljkovic V, Nakayama K. (1999). Saccades require focal attention and are facilitated by a short-term memory system. Vision Research, 39(8): 1555-66.

Keller EL, McPeek RM, Salz T. (2000). Evidence against direct connections to paramedian pontine reticular formation burst neurons from superior colliculus in the monkey. Journal of Neurophysiology, 84(3): 1303-13.

McPeek RM, Skavenski AA, Nakayama K. (2000). Concurrent processing of saccades in visual search. Vision Research, 40(18): 2499-516.

McPeek RM, Keller EL. (2001). Short-term priming, concurrent processing, and saccade curvature during a target selection task in the monkey. Vision Research, 41(6): 785-800.

McPeek RM, Keller EL. (2002). Superior colliculus activity related to concurrent processing of saccade goals in a visual search task. Journal of Neurophysiology, 87(4): 1805-15.

Keller EL, McPeek RM. (2002). Neural Discharge in Superior Colliculus During Target Search Paradigms. Neurobiology of Eye Movements: From Molecules to Behavior, Annals of the New York Academy of Science, 956: 1-13.

McPeek RM, Keller EL. (2002). Saccade target selection in the superior colliculus during a visual search task. Journal of Neurophysiology, 88(4): 2019-34.

McPeek RM, Han JH, Keller EL. (2003). Competition between saccade goals in the superior colliculus produces saccade curvature. Journal of Neurophysiology, 89(5): 2577-90.

McPeek RM, Keller EL. (2004). Deficits in saccade target selection after inactivation of superior colliculus. Nature Neuroscience, 7(7): 757-63.

Arai K, McPeek RM, Keller EL. (2004). Properties of saccadic responses in monkey when multiple competing visual stimuli are present. Journal of Neurophysiology, 91(2): 890-900.

McPeek RM. (2004). Strange things, moving things, wild animals. Focus on "The neural correlates of automatic and goal-driven biases in orienting spatial attention." Journal of Neurophysiology, 92(3): 1267-8.

Keller EL, Lee K-M, McPeek RM. (2005). Readout of higher-level processing in the discharge of superior colliculus neurons. Annals of the New York Academy of Science, 1039: 198-208.

McPeek RM. (2006). Incomplete suppression of distractor-related activity in the frontal eye field results in curved saccades. Journal of Neurophysiology, 96(5): 2699-711.

Song JH, Takahashi N, McPeek RM. (2008). Target selection for visually-guided reaching in macaque. Journal of Neurophysiology, 99(1): 14-24.

McPeek RM. (2008). Reversal of a distractor effect on saccade target selection after superior colliculus inactivation. Journal of Neurophysiology, 99(5): 2694-702.

Khan AZ, Bloehm G, McPeek RM, Lefevre P. (2009). Differential influence of attention on gaze and head movements. Journal of Neurophysiology, 101(1): 198-206.

Song JH, McPeek RM. (2009). Eye-hand coordination during target selection in a pop-out visual search. Journal of Neurophysiology, 102(5): 2681-92.

Song JH, McPeek RM. (2010). Roles of narrow- and broad-spiking dorsal premotor area neurons in reach target selection and movement production. Journal of Neurophysiology, 103(4): 2124-38.

Khan AZ, Heinen SJ, McPeek RM. (2010). Attentional cueing at the saccade goal, not at the target location, facilitates saccades. Journal of Neuroscience, 30(16): 5481-8.

Khan AZ, Song J-H,McPeek RM. (2011). The eye dominates in guiding attention during simultaneous eye and hand movements. Journal of Vision, 11(1): 1-14.

Recent Conference Abstracts

 

McPeek RM, Keller EL. (2003). The effects of reversible inactivation of Frontal Eye Field and Superior Colliculus on saccade target selection. Journal of Vision, 3, 694

Arai K, McPeek RM, Keller EL. (2003). Trajectory errors in saccades when multiple competing visual stimuli are present. Neural Control of Movement

McPeek RM, Keller EL. (2003). Effects of superior colliculus inactivation on saccade target selection. Progress in Sensorimotor Research: Laboratory of Sensorimotor Research 25th Anniversary Symposium, 20

McPeek RM. (2003). Saccade target selection after inactivation of superior colliculus: Effects of target discriminability and number of distractors. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 79.7

Lee K-M, McPeek RM, Keller EL. (2004). The second visual burst activity in the SC cells is not visual but cognitive. Neural Control of Movement

McPeek RM. (2004). Comparing the effects of frontal eye field and superior colliculus inactivation on saccade target selection. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 186.13

McPeek RM. (2005). Incomplete suppression of distractor-related activity in frontal eye field results in curved saccades. Vision Sciences Society Abstracts, 583

Lee BT, McPeek RM. (2005). Attentional visual search in the macaque. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 165.13

McPeek RM. (2005). Competition between target and distractors in the frontal eye field results in curved saccades. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 166.5

McPeek RM, Takahashi N. (2006). The effects of frontal eye field inactivation on covert attention shifts in macaque. Cognitive Neuroscience Society, G21

McPeek RM, Takahashi N. (2006). Frontal eye field inactivation causes deficits in covert visual search. Vision Sciences Society Abstracts, 929

Lee BT, McPeek RM. (2006). Color popout and spatial precues affect visual search in monkey. Cognitive Neuroscience Society, G19

McPeek RM, Takahashi N. (2006). Deficits in cued and uncued shifts of attention after inactivation of frontal eye field. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 606.10

McPeek RM. (2007). Roles of superior colliculus and frontal eye field in voluntary and reflexive attention shifts. International Workshop on Attention, March 11-15, Buenos Aires, AR

Song J-H, McPeek RM, Takahashi N. (2007). Target selection for visually-guided reaching in macaque. Vision Sciences Society Abstracts, 396

McPeek RM. (2007). Superior colliculus activity related to reflexive and top-down shifts of attention. Vision Sciences Society Abstracts, 437

Khan AZ, Blohm G, McPeek RM, Lefevre P. (2008). Attentional cues differently affect eye and head latencies in head-unrestrained gaze shifts. Neural Control of Movement, 102

Song J-H, McPeek RM. (2008). Target selection for visually-guided reaching in the dorsal premotor area during a visual search task. Cosyne: Computational and Systems Neuroscience, I-50

McPeek RM, Lee B-T. (2008). Roles of Superior Colliculus and Frontal Eye Field in Stimulus-Driven and Top-down Attention Shifts. Cognitive Neuroscience Society, B34

Khan AZ, McPeek RM. (2008). Differentiated visual and motor components of cueing effects on anti-saccades. Cognitive Neuroscience Society, B23

Song J-H, McPeek RM. (2008). Eye-hand coordination for target selection in macaque. Cognitive Neuroscience Society, B118

Song J-H, McPeek RM. (2008). Target selection for visually-guided reaching in the dorsal premotor area during a visual search task. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 17.4

Khan AZ, Heinen SJ, McPeek RM. (2008). Attention at the motor goal, not the target location, facilitates adapted saccades. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 616.4

Khan AZ, Takahashi N, Heinen SJ, McPeek RM. (2008). The spatial extent of attention for saccades: attentional facilitation compared to inhibition of return in humans and monkeys. Vision Science Society Abstracts, 23.313

Song J-H, McPeek RM. (2008). Target selection for visually-guided reaching in the dorsal premotor area during a visual search task. Vision Sciences Society Abstracts, 35.26

McPeek RM, Andersen RA, Cisek P, Hoshi E, Song J-H. (2009). The neural basis of target selection for reaching movements. Neural Control of Movement, 17

Khan AZ, Heinen SJ, McPeek RM. (2009). Attentional cueing facilitates saccade planning and not visual target processing. Neural Control of Movement, 93

Song J-H, Rafal RD, McPeek RM. (2009). Deficits in target selection for reaching movements after superior colliculus inactivation. Cognitive Neuroscience Society, 172

McPeek RM, Song J-H. (2009). Neural correlates of target selection for reaching movements in the superior colliculus. Cognitive Neuroscience Society, 173

Khan AZ, Takahashi N, Heinen SJ, McPeek RM. (2009). The spatial extent of attentional facilitation and inhibition of return in humans and monkeys. Frontiers in Systems Neuroscience. Conference Abstract: Computational and systems neuroscience. doi: 10.3389/conf.neuro.06.2009.03.004

Khan AZ, Song J-H, McPeek RM. (2009). The eye dominates in guiding attention during simultaneous eye and hand movements. Society for Neuroscience Abstracts, 501.8

Khan AZ, Song J-H, McPeek RM. (2010). Attention is predominantly guided by the eye during concurrent eye-hand movements. Vision Sciences Society Abstracts, 23.323

Song J-H, Rafal R, McPeek RM. (2010). Neural substrates of target selection for reaching movements in superior colliculus. Vision Sciences Society Abstracts, 42.13

Khan AZ, Song JH, McPeek RM. (2011). The eye dominates in guiding attention during simultaneous eye and hand movements. Journal of Vision 11(1): 9.