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Current PhD Students

Reynolds Ablordeppey
Reynolds Kwame Ablordeppey
Reynolds Kwame Ablordeppey completed his Doctor of Optometry degree from the Kwame Nkrumah University of Science and Technology, Ghana in 2016. His research interests are focused on myopia development and progression as well as related structural and functional changes. His research advisor is Dr. Alexandra Benavente.
Khulan Batsuuri
Khulan Batsuuri
Khulan Batsuuri has graduated and received her MD from the School of Medicine, Mongolian National University of Health Sciences and continued her study in MS in Neuroscience program in the University of Hartford. Before enrolling in PhD in Vision Science program at the SUNY College of Optometry, she has worked on an epigenetic project to study the effects of transcription factors, Ezh2 and G9a, on retinal ganglion cells at Schepen`s Eye Research Institute, Boston. Her research interest is retinal neurodegeneration, including Glaucoma and optic nerve regeneration. She is looking forward to working with Dr.Bloomfield and Dr.Viswanathan to study the possibility of early detection and potential treatment of the Glaucoma.

 

Zhehao Huang
Zhehao Huang
Zhehao Huang received his Bachelor of Science from the School of Psychological and Cognitive Science, Peking University. He entered the PhD program in 2015, and now is a fourth-year student in Dr. Qasim Zaidi’s lab. During the first year, he focused on a sequential attraction in human color perception, and has presented in VSS 2016. He is currently working on a behavior and neural model of illuminant and color estimation in complex color scenes.
Sohrab Najafian
Sohrab Najafian
Sohrab received his MSc in biomedical engineering from Iran University of Science and Technology. He is second year PhD student working under supervision of Dr. Jose-Manuel Alonso. He is currently working on a model to explain how afferents coming from both eyes are arranged in primary visual cortex (V1) precisely within small portion of our brain. The visual information coming from our both eyes are segregated based on specific features like orientation, or retinal position (retinotopy). This segregation results in several overlaid visual maps. The focus of his research is to study these maps more accurately than the past through developing some image processing techniques. The final goal of this project is to reach the knowledge required to design a chip that could be replaced with this part of visual system to help those who are suffering from related diseases.

 

Rakesh Nanjappa
Rakesh Nanjappa
Rakesh Nanjappa graduated in 2014 from University of Hyderabad (India) with Integrated Masters in Optometry and Vision Science, after which he did one year of course work in M.Phil Cognitive Science from the same university. His broad research interest is to investigate the relationship between eye movements and attention. His masters thesis explored the effect of low-level image features on fixational eye movements. His first project in the PhD program was to explore the role of microsaccades in high acuity visuomotor tasks. He is currently studying the neural correlates of ‘inhibition of return’ by recording from superior colliculus in NHP during free visual search. His research advisor is Dr. Robert McPeek.
Poster Presentations:

  • R Nanjappa, R McPeek. “Microsaccades while aiming are not just limited by gaze relocation demands.” Vision Science Society Annual Meeting, St. Pete Beach, FL, May 2017 (abstract published: https://jov.arvojournals.org/article.aspx?articleid=2651760)
  • R Nanjappa, R Azadi, R McPeek. “Contextual saccade adaptation as a tool to investigate sequential saccades.” Vision Science Society Annual Meeting, St. Pete Beach, FL, May 2016
Hamed Rahimi Nasrabadi
Hamed Rahimi Nasrabadi
Hamed Rahimi Nasrabadi received his Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering with minor in Physics from Sharif University of Technology, Tehran and was a research assistant at the Brain Engineering Research Center, IPM. He recently started his PhD at the Graduate Center for Vision Science of the State University of New York (Fall of 2017). His main interests are to: (1) study the functional organization of visual pathways, (2) develop computational models of neural mechanisms underlying vision and (3) develop neural prosthesis to restore visual impairment. His Research Advisor is Dr. Jose-Manuel Alonso.

 

Maria Pons-Torres
Carmen Pons
Carmen Pons completed her degree at the Medical School of the University Miguel Hernández (Alicante, Spain). Her ultimate goal is to complete my Doctorate in Vision Science at SUNY Optometry with her advisor, Dr. Jose Manuel Alonso in order to improve her own competence in such an interesting field. She would like to focus her research career towards achieving two objectives. Firstly, opening new horizons and helping to increment our knowledge in this field and secondly, pioneer new ways that will contribute to the development of medical curative processes. She proposes to meet these two goals by developing a working model where laboratory research is closely related to clinical work. Her aim is to bridge the gap between basic research and clinical practice. For example, use the experience acquired in clinical work to improve experimental design in basic research.
Posters:

  • C. Pons, M Jansen, X Li, Y.Bereshpolova, H. Swadlow, M. Alonso. (2015) Phase selectivity of simple and complex cells in visual cortex. Society for Neuroscience. Dept. of Biological Science, SUNY-Optometry, New York, NY 10036 and Dept. of Psychology, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269. Abstract 510.01
  • C. Pons, R. Mazade, J. Jin, M. Dul, Q. Zaidi, M. Alonso (2016). Visual dominance for darks increases with low light and optical blur. European Conference on Visual Perception. Dept. of Biological Science, SUNY-Optometry, New York, NY 10036.Abstract 2P065
  • C. Pons, R. Mazade, J. Jin, M. Dul, Q. Zaidi, M. Alonso (2016). Visual dominance for darks increases with low light and optical blur. Society for Neuroscience. Dept. of Biological Science, SUNY-Optometry, New York, NY 10036.Abstract 713
  • CC. Pons, R. Mazade, J. Jin, M. Alonso (2017). Optical blur affects differently ON and OFF visual pathways. Society for Neuroscience. Dept. of Biological Science, SUNY-Optometry, New York, NY 10036.Abstract 402.04
  • Pons C, R. Mazade, J. Jin, M. Dul, Q. Zaidi, M. Alonso (2018). Visual dominance for darks increases in amblyopia. Society for Neuroscience. Dept. of Biological Science, SUNY-Optometry, New York, NY 10036. Abstract 579.04

Talks:

  • Pons C, R. Mazade, J. Jin, M. Dul, Q. Zaidi, M. Alonso (2018). Visual dominance for darks increases in amblyopia. Vision Science Society. Dept. of Biological Science, SUNY-Optometry, New York, NY 10036. Abstract 34.26

Publications:

  • Pons C, Mazade R, Jin J, Dul M, Zaidi Q, Alonso JM. (2017). Neuronal mechanisms underlying differences in spatial resolution between darks and lights in human vision. J Vis. 2017 Dec 1;17(14):5
Toan Trinh
Toan Trinh
Toan Trinh received his BA in Economics from Dartmouth College in 2006 and Doctor of Optometry from New England College of Optometry in 2011. He entered the PhD program in the Fall of 2018 and works with Dr. Suresh Viswanathan to utilize electrophysiological techniques to understand the mechanisms underlying visual dysfunction in mild traumatic brain injury.

 

Rong Wang
Rong Wang
Rong Wang graduated with her MD from Tongji Medical School of Huazhong University of Science and Technology, China. After graduation, she continued to pursue her Master of Science in Ophthalmology. Rong entered the PhD program at the Graduate Center for Vision Research of State University of New York in the Fall of 2018.Her research interest is focused on retinal neurodegenerative diseases. She is currently doing the lab rotation under the supervision of Dr. Bloomfield to study the roles of neuronal gap junctions in glaucoma.